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Kapiti Island: 2 …must come down

We strode back down the track to the intersection of Wilkinson and Trig, turning right into the latter. It was more rustic than the earlier path though there was still a vaguely discernible track.

Not that way. The other way

Not that way. The other way

Markers were useful, until they seemed to disappear

Markers were useful, until they seemed to disappear

With camera in hand I wandered along much as I had on the way up, gazing out and up more than down. Then I tripped on one of the many exposed tree roots and thought I had better be more attentive.

However the track was damp and slippery from recent rain and best endeavours to be careful and sure-footed still didn’t save me from another couple of trips and falls. (More from good luck than good management my camera and dodgy wrist escaped intact.) Mike it transpires could be part-mountain goat and he almost skipped down the treacherous path.

Kapiti Island Trig Track

The brochure compared the Trig track to the other: “Considerably steeper, with narrow, uneven sections.” Pretty accurate really. Later we surmised that it could have been the original track up to the summit.

It was a good call that we didn’t walk up this way.

A feed station... I would never have called myself a bird watcher but we did stop here for 5 mins (when in Rome and all that)

A feed station… I would never have called myself a bird watcher but we did stop here for 5 mins (when in Rome and all that)

Success! A female stitchbird, also known as hihi. One of NZ's rarest birds

Success! A female stitchbird, also known as hihi. One of NZ’s rarest birds

The track was only 2km long and when the terrain started to even out it was a good clue we were nearing the end. This also boded well for my chances of staying upright.

Nikau palm, Kapiti Island

The bush-surrounded seat is a memorial to Flying Officer R M Jones of the RNZAF who died in WW2. Apparently the seat once had a view of the sea - you'd never believe it now

The bush-surrounded seat is a memorial to Flying Officer R M Jones of the RNZAF who died in WW2. Apparently the seat once had a view of the sea – you’d never believe it now

Yep. Cheers.

Yep. Cheers.

A kaka, or large brown bush parrot. Not in the least bit timid, around us 2-legged folk at least

A kaka, or large brown bush parrot. Not in the least bit timid, around us 2-legged folk at least

The kaka was quite happy in his tree but I’ve seen photos of them perched on people. In my last post, another blogger commented that one had bit her lip as it sat on her while she was eating a cracker!

Kapiti Island vegetation

There was enough time before the ferry was due to have a decent walk around. We were keen to find some takahe but they weren’t keen to find us and stayed well hidden. Not to worry, there was plenty of amazing vegetation to take in and the inevitable bird or two of varieties that weren’t playing hard to get.

A house for DOC staff peeks through the trees

A house for DOC staff peeks through the trees

Kapiti Island vegetation

The pot is a relic from whaling days

The pot is a relic from whaling days

Kapiti Island sign

A young tui

A young tui

Another young tui I think, though bird expert I am not

Another young tui I think, though bird expert I am not

Kapiti Island looking back to mainland

The high tide line is thick with driftwood

The high tide line is thick with driftwood

Another weka, just to round out the bird gallery

Another weka, just to round out the bird gallery

The ferry arrived and we stepped off Kapiti Island.

Boarding Kapiti Island ferry

As something of a bonus we tracked north along the eastern shore to collect visitors from the North End, which gave us a peek there. The island’s only accommodation is here (on private land that has been looked after by the same family since the 1820s) as are a few other walks. Another day maybe.

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9 Comments Post a comment
  1. Fabulous photographs Hayley. Your trek reminded me a bit of mine this week in the jungle. I loved the driftwood and also the graffiti carved into the bamboo. The birds look wonderful. I’ve still yet to see any beautiful birds here. I think they must be hiding. Lots of spiders though!!!!! 😀

    25 May 2013
    • By now it goes without saying, but I would be a complete and utter wuss in a habitat with lots of spiders! I’m so grateful that our creepy crawlies here are generally well hidden. That trunk does look like bamboo now you mention it, but it is a type of palm. Thanks very much Lottie 🙂

      25 May 2013
  2. What a great two part post! I read with such interest and although we didn’t get the chance to visit this time around we will have to come back to NZ to visit as it looks beautiful! I especially like your photos of the beautiful birds 🙂

    25 May 2013
    • Thanks Nicola, very much appreciated. And yes I think it’s the sort of wee side trip that would fit well amongst all your other NZ adventures!

      26 May 2013
      • No worries. Yes it would! Despite being here for a year it just didn’t fit in at any point really (along with its unpredictability)! But definitely a good excuse to return to NZ another time 🙂

        26 May 2013
  3. Haley, I had the good fortune to visit Tiritiri Sanctuary, a ferry ride from Auckland, a few years ago. Like you I am no bird watcher, but on this Island you don’t need to be! Rare species are everywhere. Thanks for reminding me of a glorious day in your beautiful country!

    25 May 2013
    • That’s an interesting tidbit! I’ve not been there but should try to on one of my visits back north. Thanks Pippa 🙂

      26 May 2013
  4. How exotic views in my eyes! I am really glad that I could take the walk thru Your lovely photos.

    31 May 2013

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