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Kapiti Island: 1 – what goes up…

A few months ago I notched up my 10th year of living in Wellington and realised I still hadn’t been to Kapiti Island.

One of the region’s best regarded features, Kapiti Island is a beautiful nature reserve managed by the Department of Conservation and is renowned as a bird sanctuary. Its iconic profile is prominent as you drive along State Highway 1.

Kapiti Island

Why had I been so slack? It’s not like it’s far away, being only a few kms off Paraparaumu Beach on the Kapiti Coast, which on a good day is about 45 mins drive north from Wellington city. But quite often it’s the stuff on your doorstep you don’t get round to doing.

I did try once before, a few years ago. The logistics involve booking a permit, a ferry ride that is quite weather sensitive, and an early start. The sailings were cancelled on the day I booked and I never got round to rescheduling.

What finally spurred me into action was a hefty price increase! With a short time horizon, Mike and I synchronised calendars and booked. But this attempt was another dud as the early morning phone call confirmed the ferry was again cancelled. We were down to just one more compatible day before the price hike.

And finally, a slightly kinder forecast meant that it was on. Early one Sunday in late January we shot off up the coast to find the Kapiti Boating Club.

Paraparaumu Beach. It wasn't a stellar day but if the weather was good enough for the boats to run, it would be good enough for us

Paraparaumu Beach. It wasn’t a stellar day but if the weather was good enough for the boats to run, it would be good enough for us

On account of the looming price rise, the charter company said this was their biggest ever day for passengers. As a result they had to run a second early sailing and we had been put on the second. I wasn’t too happy about that as our return time was unchanged meaning we’d have less time on the island. I wanted to walk up to the highest point and the published times suggested this was going to be pretty tight.

A sperm whale had beached here not long before our visit. The carcass had been taken for burial but a sign remained warning about possible nasties

A sperm whale had beached here not long before our visit. The carcass had been taken for burial but a sign remained warning about possible nasties

When it was time we all walked across the beach to the boat, still on its trailer at that stage. The launching process was unusual in that regard but soon enough we were making our way across the choppy waters.

Boarding the ferry. The boats are launched off the beach using tractors

Boarding the ferry. The boats are launched off the beach using tractors

There are two destinations on Kapiti Island to choose from. We were going to Rangatira, roughly half way along the eastern shore, where up to 50 people can visit per day. Turns out we were the only two of our sailing getting off here. North End is the other stop where 18 visitors per day are permitted.

It was just the two of us disembarking at Rangatira and after we scurried off the boat promptly pulled away

It was just the two of us disembarking at Rangatira and after we scurried off the boat promptly pulled away

Before long we were intercepted by a DOC ranger who took us to the visitor centre

Before long we were intercepted by a DOC ranger who took us to the visitor centre

With time a bit scarce I was keen to find the track and get going. But first we sat through the talk, which went a bit quicker with just the two of us. She said the previous session was with 40 people.

Which got us thinking. Maybe our later arrival would be to our advantage as we wouldn’t be caught up with the ‘crowds’.

First weka encounter during the introductory talk

First weka encounter during the introductory talk

Finally we were released. There are two paths up to the top: the 3.8km Wilkinson Track and the 2km Trig Track. The brochure said they take the same amount of time. We tossed the figurative coin and turned up the longer track.

Later on we’d thank ourselves we did.

A peek across to the mainland

A peek across to the mainland

Zig zagging up the Wilkinson Track

Zig zagging up the Wilkinson Track

Kapiti Island tree

It was a beautiful walk. We’d get the occasional peak out across the water but for the most part we were enclosed in some of the most gorgeous native bush you’ll find in NZ. We didn’t make too much effort to find or see birds, that wasn’t really why we were there, so unless they jumped out and waved hello (which they didn’t) we would be oblivious to their presence.

Kapiti Island tree with holes

Traps are set up to help ensure the island remains pest free

Traps are set up to help ensure the island remains pest free

After powering up the hill, pausing numerous times for photos, passing a couple of rowdy family groups, we came to the intersection where both tracks meet and you make the final trudge up to the summit.

We arrived at the summit well inside the two hour guideline, hungry and ready to sit down. Momentarily taken aback at how many people were in the small clearing, we headed on up to the trig lookout. It wasn’t the clearest of days but it was a unique vantage point here at Tuteremoana with views both west out to the Tasman Sea and east back to the mainland.

The lunch break was occupied with chewing and more weka watching.

View from Tuteremoana, the summit

View from Tuteremoana, the summit

View from Tuteremoana, Kapiti Island

Trig at the summit

Trig at the summit

Quite crowded at the top

Quite crowded at the top

Excellent place for another weka close encounter

Excellent place for another weka close encounter

With an eye on the clock we didn’t stay too long, keen to get back down and explore the flat. Mike suggested we take the Trig Track and yep, that seemed a good idea to me. Of course I didn’t know then what I would soon be finding out.

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11 Comments Post a comment
  1. Fabulous views Hayley

    20 May 2013
  2. Wow that’s a beautiful place and looks like a great hike. Any trip that begins on a boat is a good one, I think ๐Ÿ™‚ Thanks for sharing your photos!

    20 May 2013
    • Thank you! We’re lucky to have access to such places.

      20 May 2013
  3. That’s the craziest ferry I have ever seen!

    21 May 2013
    • No frills, that’s for sure! Rudimentary but functional given the absence of a jetty at either end.

      21 May 2013
  4. Great post! Was there once, and loved it ๐Ÿ™‚ Watch out for the kaka!

    21 May 2013
    • Thanks Tina ๐Ÿ™‚ Yes if it wasn’t for another couple peering up into a tree we would’ve walked right on by the kaka.

      21 May 2013
      • One of them bit my lip while I was there, as it came to sit on me while I ate my crackers… and i didn’t think it’d be brave enough to go for it when I was eating! Big mistake ๐Ÿ˜€

        22 May 2013
        • I knew they weren’t timid but that’s ridiculous! Ouch.

          22 May 2013
  5. Wonderful photos from the other side of our world.

    24 May 2013

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